George Anderson

George Anderson

Visiting Fellow, 2013-2014

Senior Global Fellow from Practice & Government, NYU School of Law

George R.M. Anderson was a civil servant in the Canadian government, with senior appointments in the Energy, Foreign Affairs, and Finance departments before becoming Deputy Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (1996-2002) and Natural Resources (2002-2005). He was President of the Forum of Federations, an international NGO supported by nine countries, from 2005-2011, and an expert member of the stand-by team of the Mediation Support Unit, United Nations in 2012-13. He continues to work with the United Nations on the constitutional transition in Yemen. He has worked or lectured in over 25 countries. Mr. Anderson was educated at Queen’s, Oxford and the École Nationale d’Administration in Paris, and was a Fellow at Harvard’s Center for International Affairs (1992-93). He is the author of Federalism: An Introduction (OUP, 2008) and Fiscal Federalism: An Introduction (OUP, 2010), which have been translated into 22 and 12 languages respectively. He is also the editor of Oil and Gas in Federal Systems and Internal Markets and Multilevel Governance (both OUP, 2012) and co-editor of Federal Rivers (Edward Elgar, forthcoming 2014). Mr. Anderson served as a mentor at the Trudeau Foundation (2011) and as the Vice-Chair for the Board of Trustees at Queen’s University. He is a Member of the Advisory Committee for the Mowat Centre, University of Toronto.

Radhika Coomaraswamy

Radhika Coomaraswamy

Visiting Fellow, Spring 2013

Special Representative of the UN Secretary General for Children and Armed Conflict

Radhika Coomaraswamy is the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General for Children and Armed Conflict and has served since April 2006. Ms. Coomaraswamy was formerly the Chairperson of the Sri Lanka Human Rights Commission (2003-2006) and Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women (1994-2003). She is an internationally known human rights advocate who has won many awards in recognition of her work. Ms. Coomaraswamy is a graduate of the United Nations International School in New York, Yale University (B.A.), Columbia University (J.D) and Harvard University (LLM). She has written extensively on ethnicity, gender and human rights issues.

David Dyzenhaus

David Dyzenhaus

Visiting Fellow, 2013-2014

Professor of Law and Philosophy & Albert Abel Chair, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

David Dyzenhaus is a professor of Law and Philosophy at the University of Toronto, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He has taught in South Africa, England, Canada, Singapore, New Zealand, Hungary, and the USA. He holds a doctorate from Oxford University and law and undergraduate degrees from the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. In 2002, he was the Law Foundation Visiting Fellow in the Faculty of Law, University of Auckland. In 2005-06 he was the Herbert Smith Visiting Professor in the Cambridge Law Faculty and a Senior Scholar of Pembroke College, Cambridge. In 2014-15, he will be the Arthur Goodhart Visiting Professor in Legal Science in Cambridge. Professor Dyzenhaus is the author of Hard Cases in Wicked Legal Systems: South African Law in the Perspective of Legal Philosophy (now in its second edition), Legality and Legitimacy: Carl Schmitt, Hans Kelsen, and Hermann Heller in Weimar, and Judging the Judges, Judging Ourselves: Truth, Reconciliation and the Apartheid Legal Order. He has edited and co-edited several collections of essays. In 2004 he gave the JC Smuts Memorial Lectures to the Faculty of Law, Cambridge University. These were published by Cambridge University Press in 2006 as The Constitution of Law: Legality in a Time of Emergency.

Mohammad Fadel

Mohammad Fadel

Visiting Fellow, Fall 2013

Associate Professor & Canada Research Chair for the Law and Economics of Islamic Law, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Mohammad H. Fadel is the Canada Research Chair for the Law and Economics of Islamic Law and Associate Professor at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, which he joined in January 2006. Professor Fadel teaches Business Organizations, The Law of International Business and Finance Transactions, Religion and the Liberal State: the Case of Islam, and Trusts. He wrote his Ph.D. dissertation on legal process in medieval Islamic law while at the University of Chicago. He received his JD from the University of Virginia in 1999 and was admitted to the Bar of New York in 2000. Professor Fadel served as a law clerk to the Honorable Paul V. Niemeyer of the United States Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit and the Honorable Anthony A. Alaimo of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Georgia. He practiced law with the firm of Sullivan & Cromwell LLP in New York, New York, in the Financial Institutions Group and Corporate and Finance, where he worked on a wide variety of corporate finance transactions, mergers and acquisitions, securities-related regulatory investigations and bank regulatory matters. Professor Fadel has published numerous articles in Islamic legal history and Islam and liberalism.

Stephen Gardbaum

Stephen Gardbaum

Visiting Fellow, Spring 2013

MacArthur Foundation Professor of International Justice & Human Rights, UCLA School of Law

Stephen Gardbaum is the MacArthur Foundation Professor of International Justice and Human Rights at UCLA School of Law. He is currently a joint Straus and Senior Emile Noël Fellow at NYU, and was the 2011-12 Guggenheim Fellow in constitutional studies. An internationally recognized constitutional scholar, his research focuses on comparative constitutional law, constitutional theory, and federalism. His forthcoming book, The New Commonwealth Model of Constitutionalism: Theory and Practice (Cambridge University Press, 2013), explores recent constitutional transitions in Canada, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom and develops the general underlying model of rights protection that he had previously identified. He was the keynote speaker at the 2009 Protecting Human Rights conference in Australia, part of the major debate in that country about adopting this model through a national human rights act. A current work-in-progress addresses whether the model’s “weak-form” of judicial review is applicable to transitional democracies. Other recent work includes a series of articles on the comparative structure of constitutional rights, which have just been collected and published as a book by the European Research Center of Comparative Law. Gardbaum holds degrees from Oxford, London, Columbia and Yale Universities, and teaches constitutional law, comparative constitutional law, EU law, comparative law, and international human rights. His scholarship has been cited by the U.S. and Canadian Supreme Courts and widely translated.

Lech Garlicki

Lech Garlicki

Visiting Fellow, Fall 2013

Professor of Law, University of Warsaw School of Law

Judge Lech Garlicki (born in 1946 in Warsaw, Poland) is a Polish jurist and constitutional law specialist. Since 1968 he has worked at the Warsaw University (since 1987 as full professor).  From 1980-1993 he was member of the Warsaw bar, from 1993-2001 he was a judge of the Constitutional Court of Poland and from 2002-2012 he was a judge of the European Court of Human Rights (president of the 4th Section in 2011-2012). Judge Garlicki is vice president of the International Association of Constitutional Law and one of the Founding Members of the European Law Institute. He has lectured at numerous universities in Europe, the United States, Israel, Japan, China and Hong Kong. He is author or editor of over 300 publications in different languages, including a five-volume Commentary to the 1997 Constitution of Poland and two-volume Commentary to the European Convention on Human Rights.

Christopher McCrudden

Christopher McCrudden

Visiting Fellow, 2013-2014

Professor of Human Rights and Equality Law, Queen’s University Belfast, and William W. Cook Global Law Professor at the University of Michigan Law School

Christopher McCrudden is Professor of Human Rights and Equality Law, Queen’s University Belfast, and William W. Cook Global Law Professor at the University of Michigan Law School. He is a graduate of Queen’s University Belfast (1970-1974). He was awarded a Harkness Felllowship in 1974 and spent two years at Yale Law School (1974-76), and then at Oxford University as a doctoral student, first at Nuffield College (1976-77), and then at Balliol College as a Junior Research Fellow (1977-80). He was elected as Fellow and Tutor in Law at Lincoln College, and CUF Lecturer in the Oxford Law Faculty in 1980, and Professor of Human Rights Law in 1998. He is a barrister at the English Bar (Gray’s Inn) and has been called to the Northern Ireland Bar; he is a Non-Resident Tenant at Blackstone Chambers. Specializing in human rights, he concentrates on issues of equality and discrimination, as well as the relationship between international economic law and human rights. He is the author of Buying Social Justice (Oxford University Press, 2007), a book about the relationship between public procurement and equality, for which he was awarded a Certificate of Merit by the American Society of International Law in 2008. He serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including the Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, the International Journal of Discrimination and the Law, and the Journal of International Economic Law, and is co-editor of the Law in Context series. He serves on the European Commission’s Expert Network on the Application of the Gender Equality Directives. In 2006, Queen’s University, Belfast, awarded him an honorary LLD. He was elected a fellow of the British Academy in 2008, and in 2011 he was awarded a three-year Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship.

Gianluca Parolin

Gianluca Parolin

Visiting Fellow, 2012-2013

Assistant Professor of Law at the American University in Cairo, Egypt

Gianluca P. Parolin is assistant professor of law in the American University in Cairo, Egypt, where he teaches comparative law, comparative constitutional law, and Islamic law reform. Gianluca earned his LL.B./LL.M. (University of Torino, Italy) in comparative public law with a thesis on the caliphate and contemporary forms of government in Muslim-majority countries, and his Ph.D. (University of Torino, Italy) in public law with a dissertation on the multiple levels of membership and political participation in Arab states, which was later published as Citizenship in the Arab World (Amsterdam University Press, 2009). Fascinated by the first constitutional transition of the 21st century in the region, Gianluca contributed to the debate on the new Bahraini constitution and was invited to observe the first parliamentary elections in thirty years. Gianluca has followed Bahrain ever since, and has recently published a comparative study of the role of parliament in 1973-75 and after the 2002 constitution in an edited book titled: Political Change in the Arab Gulf states: Stuck in Transition (Lynne Rienner, 2011). Asked to be the rapporteur on constitutional provisions on shari‘ah to the Second Conference of the International Consortium on Law and Religion Studies (ICLARS) in 2011, Gianluca has started developing a coherent comparative overview of such provisions within the overall trajectory of legal systems in Muslim-majority countries. Gianluca has offered special courses on the constitutional transition in Egypt and has actively participated in the public debate over a variety of issues associated with the transition and constitutional design.

Wojciech Sadurski

Wojciech Sadurski

Visiting Fellow, 2013-14

Challis Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of Sydney and Professor of the Centre for Europe at Warsaw University

Wojciech Sadurski is Challis Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of Sydney and Professor of the Centre for Europe at Warsaw University. He has taught at several institutions around the world, such as Cornell Law School and Cardozo Law School in the United States, and at universities across Europe: in Trento, Paris, and Warsaw. He was Professor of Legal Theory and Philosophy of Law at the European University Institute in Florence from 1999-2009. Specializing in philosophy of law, political theory, constitutional theory and comparative constitutional law, his most recent books include: Rights Before Courts: A Study of Constitutional Courts in Postcommunist States of Central and Eastern Europe (Springer, 2005), Equality and Legitimacy (Oxford University Press, 2008) and Constitutionalism and the Enlargement of Europe (Oxford University Press, 2012). A member of a number of governing and program bodies of think tanks and NGOs dealing with human rights and democracy promotion, he is currently Chairman of Academic Advisory Board of the Community of Democracies.