Zaid Al-Ali

Project: Security Sector Oversight: Protecting Democratic Consolidation from Authoritarian Backsliding and Partisan Abuse

Zaid Al-Ali is the Senior Adviser on Constitution-Building for the Arab Region at International IDEA and an independent scholar.  In his work, Al-Ali focuses on constitutional developments throughout the Arab region, with a particular focus on Iraq and the wave of reforms that took place in Morocco, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Jordan and Yemen following the start of popular uprisings in December 2010.  Al-Ali has published extensively on constitutional reform in the Arab region, including on process design issues and the impact of external influence.  He is the author of The Struggle for Iraq’s Future: How Corruption, Incompetence and Sectarianism Have Undermined Democracy (Yale University Press 2014).  Prior to joining International IDEA, Zaid worked as a legal adviser to the United Nations in Iraq, focusing on constitutional, parliamentary and judicial reform.  He also practiced international commercial arbitration law for 12 years, representing clients in investment and oil and gas disputes mainly as an attorney with Shearman & Sterling LLC in Paris and also as a sole practitioner.  He holds an LL.M. from Harvard Law School, a Maitrise en Droit from the University of Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne) and an LL.B. from King’s College London.  He is the founder of the Arab Association of Constitutional Law and is a member of its executive committee.  At Princeton he will be working on a book project on the future of Arab constitutional reform.

George Anderson

George Anderson

ProjectDealing with Territorial Cleavages in Constitutional Transitions

Anderson held numerous senior appointments in the Canadian government, including in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, where he worked on the patriation of Canada’s Constitution from the United Kingdom; he also served as Deputy Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, and later Natural Resources. Within Intergovernmental Affairs, he was deeply involved in matters concerning the relationship between Canada’s federal and provincial governments, and the federal government’s response to Quebec’s 1995 secession referendum.

He left government in 2005 to pursue his interest in federalism as the President and CEO of the Forum of Federations, an international governance organization funded by ten federal states with programs in over twenty countries. Anderson worked on constitutional transitions in Iraq, Kenya, Nepal, Somalia, and Sudan. The Forum shares experience amongst federations and provides assistance in countries considering federalism. While at the Forum, Anderson wrote short introductory books on federalism and fiscal federalism, both of which have been widely translated, and edited volumes on oil and gas in federations and internal markets in federal systems. More recently, he co-edited a book on federal rivers, which will appear early in 2014.

In 2012–13 Anderson was a member of the United Nations Standby Team of Mediation Experts, which took him to yet more countries engaged in constitutional transitions. Since March of 2014, he has been working closely with Jamal Benomar, the U.N. Special Adviser on Yemen. Following Ali Abdullah Saleh’s removal from power, Yemen has engaged in a National Dialogue Conference (NDC) composed of over 500 representatives of political parties and diverse civil society groups, as well as the dissident groups from the South and North. The Southern issue is perhaps the most intractable, given the deep alienation of the South, which feels it has been systematically exploited since the country’s unification in 1990.

Zoltan Barany

Zoltan Barany

Project: Security Sector Reform and Constitutional Transitions in Emerging Democracies

Professor Barany’s research and writing have focused on military politics, military sociology, and democratization globally throughout his career.  His early scholarship was also concerned with ethnopolitics (particularly the Gypsies/Roma) and East European politics more generally.  His current research projects include a book on Arab armies (co-authored with Philippe Droz-Vincent of the Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Grenoble) and learning about the on-going political transition in Burma/Myanmar.

He is the author of How Armies Respond to Revolutions and Why (Princeton, 2016); The Soldier and the Changing State: Building Democratic Armies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas (Princeton, 2012); Democratic Breakdown and the Decline of the Russian Military (Princeton, 2007); The Future of NATO Expansion (Cambridge, 2003); The East European Gypsies: Regime Change, Marginality, and Ethnopolitics (Cambridge, 2001); and Soldiers and Politics in Eastern Europe, 1945-90 (Macmillan, 1993).  Professor Barany is the co-editor of five other books and has published dozens of articles in academic and policy journals including Armed Forces & SocietyComparative PoliticsEthnic & Racial StudiesGovernment  & Opposition, Journal of DemocracyJournal of Strategic StudiesParametersPolicy ReviewPolitical Science QuarterlyPresidential Studies QuarterlySecurity StudiesSlavic Review, Strategic Studies Quarterly, and World Politics.

He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations (New York) and the International Institute for Strategic Studies (London).

Sumit Bisarya

Project: Security Sector Reform and Constitutional Transitions in Emerging Democracies

Bisarya develops global comparative knowledge, policy and advocacy resources and provides technical support to in-country constitution reform programs.  Previously, he worked with the International Development Law Organization based in Rome, Italy where he was manager of IDLO’s field programmes. He designed, managed and implemented rule of law assistance programmes in Afghanistan and East/Horn of Africa (Ethiopia, South Sudan, Kenya and Somalia).

Bisarya has been engaged in constitution-building assistance programmes in a range of countries and contexts including Tunisia, Nepal, Myanmar, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan and most recently in Chile and Ukraine.

Richard Stacey

Richard Stacey

Projects: Security Sector Reform and Constitutional Transitions in Emerging Democracies  and Security Sector Oversight: Protecting Democratic Consolidation from Authoritarian Backsliding and Partisan Abuse

Richard Stacey served as Director of Research at Constitutional Transitions at NYU Law until joining the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto as an Assistant Professor. He holds a PhD from New York University’s Institute for Law and Society and bachelors degrees in political theory and law from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. He served as law clerk to Justice Kate O’Regan and Justice Bess Nkabinde at the Constitutional Court of South Africa, and has taught courses in political theory, constitutional law, administrative law and human rights at the University of Witwatersrand, the University of Cape Town and the City University of New York Law School. In 2009 he was a research consultant during Kenya’s constitutional review process and has remained involved in constitutional transitions around the world, providing technical advice through Constitutional Transitions in Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. His work has appeared in a number of journals of law and political theory, the multi-author reference work Constitutional Law of South Africa (of which he acts as co-editor), and in books on constitutional design, land reform, and women’s rights.